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Good Money: Funding Communities, Adding Value

SEMINAR
Date: Wednesday 5th June, 2013
Time: 18.30 - 20.00
Venue: CCLA, Senator House, 85 Queen Victoria Street, London EC4V 4ET

Among the three debates under the dome of St Paul's Cathedral that together make up our City and the Common Good series, our second event was slightly surprisingly called Good Money. Good and Money don't often go together; we're used to sound money, even funny money; but can money be called good?

In the wake of the 2008 crisis, still ongoing, one area that has become pertinent to this debate is the supply of credit. Despite the creation of new kinds of money by the Bank of England and the new funding for lending scheme, many communities still cannot access fair and affordable financial services. This means families continuing to fall into difficulties, businesses are going under and economic growth is stunted.

This seminar will start with a debate on what 'good money' could look like in these communities. Panellists will discuss "good supply", "good demand" and "good interest rate terms". Finally, Bishop Peter Selby, one of the interim directing team of St Paul's Institute and a former Church Commissioner, will lead a closing discussion about how basic values, including especially those expressed in Christian faith, get pushed out when the power of money isn't reined in.

Chaired by Ben Hughes, Chief Executive of the Community Development Finance Association, including an expert panel:

Danielle Walker-Palmour - Director, Friends Provident Foundation
Peter Crook - Chief Executive, Provident Financial
Antony Macrow-Wood - former President of the British Credit Unions Association

With closing thoughts from Bishop Peter Selby, Interim Director of St Paul's Institute. 

This event is free to attend but places are limited so do book early. To register please contact Robert Gordon on   or call 020 7489 1011.